Webinar – June 14th: Proposal Writing for the Wenner-Gren Foundation: Applying for an Engaged Research Grant

On June 14th at 1:00 PM EST and 8:00 PM EST tune in for the last two installments of “Proposal Writing for the Wenner-Gren Foundation: Applying for an Engaged Research Grant”.

To register for the 1:00 PM EST event click here.

To register for the 8:00 PM EST event click here.

The past two years have forced anthropologists to reckon with their discipline’s history and the nature of the relationships they forge through their research. They are finding themselves asking themselves hard questions about the ethical implications of the work they do.

The best way to advance knowledge in anthropology is to draw on new sources of insight. The best way to ensure anthropological research has an impact is to make sure projects are meaningful for everyone involved. By supporting projects that are collaborative from the get-go, the Wenner-Gren Foundation hopes to demonstrate the value of this new approach to research for the field more generally.

Join the Foundation’s president, Danilyn Rutherford, for a discussion of the Engaged Research Grant program. Danilyn will describe the program’s objectives, go over the criteria of evaluation, and offer tips on writing a winning proposal. There will be lots of time for questions.

This workshop will have CART captioning.

Webinar – June 7th: Proposal Writing for the Wenner-Gren Foundation: Applying for an Engaged Research Grant

On June 7th, 6PM SAST | 12PM EST | 4PM GMT | 7PM EAT, the Foundation will host “Proposal Writing for the Wenner-Gren Foundation: Applying for an Engaged Research Grant”.

To register for this event click here.

The past two years have forced anthropologists to reckon with their discipline’s history and the nature of the relationships they forge through their research. They are finding themselves asking themselves hard questions about the ethical implications of the work they do.

The best way to advance knowledge in anthropology is to draw on new sources of insight. The best way to ensure anthropological research has an impact is to make sure projects are meaningful for everyone involved. By supporting projects that are collaborative from the get-go, the Wenner-Gren Foundation hopes to demonstrate the value of this new approach to research for the field more generally.

Join the Foundation’s president, Danilyn Rutherford, for a discussion of the Engaged Research Grant program. Danilyn will describe the program’s objectives, go over the criteria of evaluation, and offer tips on writing a winning proposal. There will be lots of time for questions.

This workshop is co-sponsored by the University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa with CART captioning.

Webinar – June 6th: Proposal Writing for the Wenner-Gren Foundation: Applying for an Engaged Research Grant

Wenner-Gren’s Engaged Research Grant writing workshops continue on June 6th starting at 11:00 AM Tiempo del Centro and 12:00 PM EST.

To register for this event click here.

The past two years have forced anthropologists to reckon with their discipline’s history and the nature of the relationships they forge through their research. They are finding themselves asking themselves hard questions about the ethical implications of the work they do.

The best way to advance knowledge in anthropology is to draw on new sources of insight. The best way to ensure anthropological research has an impact is to make sure projects are meaningful for everyone involved. By supporting projects that are collaborative from the get-go, the Wenner-Gren Foundation hopes to demonstrate the value of this new approach to research for the field more generally.

Join the Foundation’s president, Danilyn Rutherford, for a discussion of the Engaged Research Grant program. Danilyn will describe the program’s objectives, go over the criteria of evaluation, and offer tips on writing a winning proposal. There will be lots of time for questions.

This workshop is co-sponsored by Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Lerma, Mexico with CART captioning and Spanish translation.

Webinar – June 2nd: Proposal Writing for the Wenner-Gren Foundation: Applying for an Engaged Research Grant

 

On June 2nd at 10:00 AM EST, 5:00 PM al-Quds time, the Foundation will be hosting a second installment of, “Proposal Writing for the Wenner-Gren Foundation: Applying for an Engaged Research Grant”.

To register for this event click here.

The past two years have forced anthropologists to reckon with their discipline’s history and the nature of the relationships they forge through their research. They are finding themselves asking themselves hard questions about the ethical implications of the work they do.

The best way to advance knowledge in anthropology is to draw on new sources of insight. The best way to ensure anthropological research has an impact is to make sure projects are meaningful for everyone involved. By supporting projects that are collaborative from the get-go, the Wenner-Gren Foundation hopes to demonstrate the value of this new approach to research for the field more generally.

Join the Foundation’s president, Danilyn Rutherford, for a discussion of the Engaged Research Grant program. Danilyn will describe the program’s objectives, go over the criteria of evaluation, and offer tips on writing a winning proposal. There will be lots of time for questions.

This workshop is co-sponsored by Insaniyyat, Palestine with CART captioning and Arabic translation.

This event will also be livestreamed on Vimeo.

Proposal Writing for the Wenner-Gren Foundation: Applying for an Engaged Research Grant from Wenner-Gren Foundation on Vimeo.

 

Webinar – June 1st: Proposal Writing for the Wenner-Gren Foundation: Applying for an Engaged Research Grant

On June 1st at 9:00 AM EST, 20:00 WIB, the Foundation will be hosting, “Proposal Writing for the Wenner-Gren Foundation: Applying for an Engaged Research Grant“.

To register for this event please click here.

The past two years have forced anthropologists to reckon with their discipline’s history and the nature of the relationships they forge through their research. They are finding themselves asking themselves hard questions about the ethical implications of the work they do.

The best way to advance knowledge in anthropology is to draw on new sources of insight. The best way to ensure anthropological research has an impact is to make sure projects are meaningful for everyone involved. By supporting projects that are collaborative from the get-go, the Wenner-Gren Foundation hopes to demonstrate the value of this new approach to research for the field more generally.

Join the Foundation’s president, Danilyn Rutherford, for a discussion of the Engaged Research Grant program. Danilyn will describe the program’s objectives, go over the criteria of evaluation, and offer tips on writing a winning proposal. There will be lots of time for questions.

This workshop is co-sponsored by the Universitas Indonesia, Depok, INDONESIA with CART captioning and Indonesian translation.

This event will also be livestreamed on Vimeo.

Proposal Writing for the Wenner-Gren Foundation: Applying for an Engaged Research Grant from Wenner-Gren Foundation on Vimeo.

 

NYAS Lecture 11/8: Building Strong Bonds: Lessons from Baboons

On November 8th, 6:30 PM, EDT, the New York Academy of Sciences will host, “Building Strong Bonds: Lessons from Baboons.”

To register for this event click here. This event will also be streamed live on YouTube.

Sociality has evolved in many animal taxa, and reflects a balance between the benefits of living in groups (such as lower risk of predation and greater success in contests with other groups) and costs (greater competition over resources and exposure to infectious disease). Evolution has favored traits that enable individuals to increase the benefit/cost ratio. In some species, close social bonds may have evolved because they provide a means for individuals to increase the benefits and reduce the costs of social life. Baboon females form strong, equitable, supportive, tolerant, and stable social relationships with selected partners, particularly close kin, peers, and the sires of their offspring. These social ties help females cope with various sources of short-term stress, and females with close social bonds also reproduce more successfully and live longer than other females. I will discuss these findings and their implications for understanding the importance of social connections in humans.

FEATURED SPEAKER

Joan Silk moved to ASU’s School of Human Evolution and Social Change in 2012, from University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She is interested in how natural selection shapes the evolution of social behavior in primates.

Most of Silk’s empirical work has focused on the behavioral and reproductive strategies of female baboon. She recently initiated a comparative study of the structure and function of close social bonds in four baboon species (anubis, hamadryas, gelada, and chacma).

In particular, Silk is interested in questions that explicitly link studies of nonhuman primates to humans. Experimental work she conducts with chimpanzees and children focuses on the phylogenetic origins and ontogenetic development of prosocial preferences.

Silk received her doctorate from University of California at Davis in 1981, and spent two years as a postdoctoral fellow in the Altmann’s lab at the University of Chicago. She then joined the Department of Anthropology at Emory University.

Silk moved to UCLA in 1986, where she remained until 2012. At UCLA, she was a founding member of the Center of Behavior, Evolution, and Culture and served as department chair for six years.

DISCUSSANT

Jacinta C. Beenher is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Michigan. She is broadly interested in hormones and behavior, specifically as they relate to reproductive success. She founded and currently directs two field sites focused on wild primates: the Simien Mountains Gelada Research Project in Ethiopia (studying geladas) and the Capuchins at Taboga Research Project in Costa Rica (studying white-faced capuchins). She also directs two hormone laboratories – one at the University of Michigan (Beehner Endocrine Laboratory) and one at the Capuchins at Taboga field site (TREX Endocrine Laboratory).

 

Oct 28th: Always Already Active: A Conversation with Johnnetta B. Cole

On Thursday, October 28th, 7:00 PM EDT, the Association of Black Anthropologists will be hosting a conversation with Dr. Johnnette B. Cole.

Come join us in an inter-generational conversation about the impact and importance of Dr. Johnnette B. Cole’s new book Racism in American Public Life: A Call to Action. This event will feature graduate student Lexi Ligon and Professors Riché Barnes and Lynn Bolles. Everyone is welcome, even if you haven’t read the book.

To register to for this event click here.

 

Webinar Nov. 4th: Beyond Extractivism: Toward New Collaborative Futures in Anthropology

On November 4th, 12:00 PM EDT, the Wenner-Gren Foundation will be hosting, “Beyond Extractivism: Toward New Collaborative Futures in Anthropology”.

To register for this even click here.

This webinar explores collaborative knowledge production in relation to a stance of responsibility and accountability to the communities with whom we work (including scholarly communities), and to the communities that surround our institutional spaces, cities, territories and regions. What kind of anthropology emerges when collaboration, rather than individualist extraction is upheld as a model?

Panelists:

Carmen Rial, PhD, Professor, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina

Ndukuyakhe Ndlovu, PhD, Manager for Archaeology at South African National Parks and Senior Lecturer at the University of Pretoria

Yasmeen Arif, PhD, Professor, Shiv Nadar University

Christen Smith, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Texas at Austin

Justin Hosbey, PhD, Assistant Professor, Emory University

Moderated by:

Gustavo Lins Ribeiro, PhD, Professor, Metropolitan Autonomous University

CART captioning will be provided.

Organized by the Association of Black Anthropologists, Anthropology Southern Africa, and the Center for Experimental Ethnography

Oct. 27th: Graduate School Application Workshop

Could graduate school be for you? What makes a strong application? On October 27th at 4:00 PM ET, come join our Zoom Workshop on applying to graduate school in archaeology. To register for this event click here.

Topics covered will include:

Thinking about graduate school: Where? What type of program? How do I apply?

Preparing for graduate school: Courses to take, how to get fieldwork experience.

Money matters: How do you pay for graduate school?

Panelists include professors Zoë Crossland (Columbia), Andrew Bauer (Stanford), Peter van Dommelen (Brown) and Michael Galaty (Michigan).