New Deadline for the 2023 Current Anthropology Visual Anthropology Competition

Deadline for submission is September 16, 2022.

To be eligible for the competition, please submit at least five and no more than ten photographs, along with a 1000-word description of the theme of your collection. Submissions can illustrate any topic of anthropological interest and should be compelling visually and intellectually.

The winner will be selected by CA’s editorial board, and the photographs will be featured on the cover of each issue for 2023. The winner will be asked to write a short introductory essay to be published in CA’s February 2023 issue.

Entries can be submitted through the CA Editorial Manager.

For questions regarding this competition, please contact the editorial office at curranth@press.uchicago.edu.

Survey Time! An Investigation of the Demographics and Processes of Research Funding in U.S. Academic Anthropology

We invite you to participate in a research study titled “An Investigation of the Demographics and Processes of Research Funding in U.S. Academic Anthropology,” led by Dr. Laura Heath-Stout.

The purpose of the study is to understand the demographics of anthropology and how they shape decisions about research projects and funding applications. The study will use this information to evaluate the equity of granting agencies’ processes of soliciting applications, reviewing proposals, and making funding decisions.

You are eligible to participate if you have been a member of any of the following organizations at any time in 2016–2021: American Anthropological Association: American Association of Physical/Biological Anthropologists, American Board of Forensic Anthropology, American Society of Primatologists, Archaeological Institute of America, Register of Professional Archaeologists, Society for American Archaeology, Society for Apply Anthropology, Society for Historical Archaeology, Society of Forensic Anthropologists.

Participation is completely voluntary and does not affect your current or future funding decisions. If you consent to participate, you will be invited to fill out an anonymous survey (approximately 35 questions) related to your demographic identities, research, and experience applying grants or fellowships, if any.

We are inviting members of several professional organizations to complete the survey: we apologize if you have received this message multiple times and ask that you only fill out the survey once. If you are interested in participating, please click here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/anthfundingsm.

Webinar 12/7: Indigenous Rights, Territory, and Advocacy: Anthropology’s Colonial Legacy and Contemporary Vocation

On December 7th, 6:30 PM EST the New York Academy of Sciences lecture series continues when Drs. Patricia Ayala, Research Consultant, Museum of Ethnography in La Paz, Bolivia, and Janet M. Chernela, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Maryland, will be presenting, “Indigenous Rights, Territory, and Advocacy: Anthropology’s Colonial Legacy and Contemporary Vocation”. Dr. O. Hugo Benavides, Professor of Anthropology, Latin American and Latino studies, and, International Political Economy and Development, at Fordham University, will be moderating. To register for this even click here.

Prior to Covid-19 and the Coronavirus pandemic hitting our different communities, notions of nationalistic xenophobia, neoliberal policies of extraction, and social policies of exclusion had permeated continental landscape in the Americas. Tied to these policies and politics, Indigenous rights and territory have played a central role in anthropology since the very invention of the discipline; a foundational relationship made even more apparent as a result of the recent developments in Chile, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, and the United States, among many other countries. Recent conflicts and continuing struggles surrounding land rights point to the complex role of anthropological advocacy and Indigenous belonging in our current global context. Drawing from the past and present, anthropologists featured on this panel look to engage these topics in our ever-changing cultural political landscape – issues made even more urgent during the present pandemic crises and the ever-expanding authoritarian anti-scientific forms of governance.

SPEAKERS

Patricia Ayala has focused her research in Chile on the power relations between Indigenous people, archaeologists and the state, patrimonialization processes, collaborative methodologies and disciplinary ethics. In Chile, Dr Ayala was the coordinator of public relations between the Atacameño People and the Archaeological Research Institute and Museum of the Universidad Católica del Norte, where she also worked as an academic. She has taught at the College of the Atlantic in United States, the Universidad de Chile, the Universidad Católica del Norte and the Universidad Católica de Temuco in Chile as well as at the Universidad de Buenos Aires in Argentina. She has worked as a research consultant for the Abbe Museum (USA) and the Australian Nacional University (Australia). Patricia has made important contributions in the theoretical field and disciplinary reflections of archaeology and anthropology, which have been published in various journals and books. At the moment her research is focused on different issues of cultural heritage, specially those related to repatriation and reburial of indigenous human remains. Currently, she is working as a free-lance research consultant and has an honorary position at the Museum of Ethnography in La Paz, Bolivia.

Janet M. Chernela is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Maryland. She received her PhD with Distinction from Columbia University in 1983 and has conducted field research in the Brazilian Amazon since 1978.  Dr. Chernela is author of  the book, A Sense of Space: The Wanano Indians of the Brazilian Amazon, and numerous articles including “Language Ideology and Women’s Speech: Talking Community in the Northwest Amazon (American Anthropologist) and “The Second World of Wanano Women: Truth, Lies and Back-Talk in the Brazilian Northwest Amazon” (Journal of Linguistic Anthropology).  She has served as President of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America; Chair of the Committee for Human Rights of the American Anthropological Association; and is founder of the Association for Women of the Upper Rio Negro, AMARN (Associação de Mulheres do Alto Rio Negro, 1982), the first Amerindian women’s association in Brazil and its oldest ongoing indigenous organization.

O. Hugo Benavides is Professor of Anthropology, Latin American and Latino studies, and, International Political Economy and Development, at Fordham University, as well as, Chair of the Sociology and Anthropology Department.  He also is the founding director of the Strategic Research Consortium on Global Studies and of the Liberal Arts Program at Fordham’s London Center at Kensington.  His research has been supported by grants from the Woodrow Wilson National Foundation, National Science Foundation, Wenner Gren Foundation, Social Science Research Council and the Andrew R. Mellon Foundation. His initial interest in the past provided him an extensive archaeological practice excavating both Inca sites in the Andes and the Roman site of Pompeii in Italy.  This initial interest in the politics of the past is present in his first book, Making Ecuadorian Histories: Four Centuries of Defining the Past, (University of Texas Press, 2004), which is a study of the role of history in legitimizing the transnational concerns of Latin American social movements, including the state. His second book, The Politics of Sentiment: Remembering and Imagining Guayaquil, is a case-study of Raymond William’s hypothesis of structures of feeling as a tool of internal domination (UT Press, 2006). His third book, Drugs, Thugs and Divas: Latin American Telenovelas and Narco-Dramas, (UT Press, 2008) investigates the cultural dynamics of melodrama as it is used to re-signify the changing legacy of Latin American identity in a transnational context. He has written over 50 articles that have appeared in edited volumes and scholarly journals such as Latin American Antiquity, Critique of Anthropology, ICONOS, and Social Text, among many others.  He lives in Brooklyn with his partner of 26 years and their three cats.

Conference Program Fellow

Conference Program Fellow
Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, Inc.
New York, NY

The Wenner-Gren Foundation is a private operating foundation dedicated to the advancement of anthropology throughout the world.  Located in New York City, it is one of the major international funding sources for anthropological research and is actively engaged with the anthropological community through its grant, fellowship, conference, publication, and capacity building programs. We are committed to playing a leadership role in anthropology.  We help anthropologists advance anthropological knowledge, build sustainable careers, and amplify the impact of anthropology within the wider world. We are dedicated to broadening the conversation in anthropology to reflect the full diversity of the field.

The Foundation is committed to creating an inclusive work environment and seeks to recruit from a broad pool of talented candidates. We encourage candidates from diverse backgrounds to apply for this position. Addressing the precarity of anthropology and anthropologists is a key element of our mission.  We have designed this position in this spirit. Our aim is to hire a recent doctorate in anthropology who wishes to make service to the discipline an integral part of their career.


Fellowship Opportunity

The Conference Program Fellowship is a two-year paid fellowship. The Fellow will play a pivotal role in Wenner-Gren’s broad slate of academic gatherings.  As an integral member of a small, hardworking team, the Fellow coordinates the Conference and Workshop Program, which provides funding to organizers of small working sessions and major international meetings, and works with the President to plan and host Wenner-Gren’s Symposia and Seminars, which are designed to foster new conversations in anthropology and lead the discipline into new terrain.  In these times of crisis and transformation, the Fellow also participates in organizing and supporting webinars for the public and the broader community of anthropologists, an arena in which the Foundation has a commitment to playing a leadership role.  This position involves intensive interaction with the Foundation’s Advisory Council, which includes leading anthropologists from different subfields, regions, and traditions of scholarship.  The ideal candidate will have an advanced degree in anthropology, be intellectually curious, discerning, and strongly committed to inclusion and racial justice, and have an expansive vision of the discipline.  This individual will also be exceedingly well-organized and collegial, and have experience executing administrative tasks.  The Conference Program Fellow must be an excellent writer, have extraordinary interpersonal skills, and enjoy serving and collaborating with a diverse community of scholars and professionals.

Key Responsibilities

Oversee Conference and Workshop Grant Program:

  • Field inquiries.
  • Participate in application review process, collate results, and rank proposals.
  • Cooperate with President in final selection.
  • Communicate results with applicants.
  • Administer grants and evaluate final reports.
  • Update web information and application materials.
  • Participate in program evaluation and long-term planning.

Oversee Wenner-Gren Symposia:

  • Publicize program and field inquiries
  • Receive and circulate letters of intent with President and Advisory Council.
  • Collect, collate, and circulate feedback from Advisory Council.
  • Participate in discussion of proposed themes at Advisory Council meeting.
  • Cooperate with President in theme selection and the recruitment of organizers.
  • Research possible sites, cooperate with President in venue selection, and manage all communications with hotels and vendors.
  • Organize virtual and in person meetings with organizers. Participate in discussion of format, venue, and process for refining the theme and selecting participants and paper topics.
  • Manage communications with participants and organizers.
  • Manage travel arrangements for participants and organizers.
  • Collaborate with President and organizers to plan supplemental activities.
  • Join President in representing the Foundation at event. Document proceedings.  Serve as liaison for hotel management and vendors.  Take responsibility for all logistical arrangements and address any issues that arise.
  • Oversee preparation of Symposium papers for publication in Current Anthropology. Recruit reviewers and oversee review process.  Manage deadlines.  Coordinate with organizers, journal editors and staff.
  • Update web information.
  • Participate in program evaluation and long-term planning.

Oversee Wenner-Gren Seminars:

  • Publicize program and field inquiries.
  • Receive and circulate letters of intent with President and Advisory Council.
  • Collect, collate, and circulate feedback from Advisory Council.
  • Participate in discussion of proposed topics at Advisory Council meeting.
  • Cooperate with President in theme selection and recruitment of organizers.
  • Research possible sites, cooperate with President in venue selection, and manage all communications with hotels and vendors.
  • Research and brainstorm with President on possible formats.
  • Organize virtual and in person meetings with organizers. Participate in discussion of format, venue, and theme and help the group arrive at a process for developing a list of senior participants, a process for recruiting junior participants, and a description of the roles each participant will play.
  • Manage recruitment of junior participants.
  • Manage communications with participants and organizers.
  • Manage travel arrangements for participants and organizers.
  • Collaborate with President and organizers to plan supplemental activities.
  • Join President in representing the Foundation at event. Document proceedings.  Serve as liaison for hotel management and vendors.  Take responsibility for all logistical arrangements and address any issues that arise.
  • Coordinate follow-up.
  • Update web information.
  • Collaborate with President in program evaluation and long-term planning.


Qualifications and Experience

  • PhD or ABD in anthropology or closely aligned discipline.
  • Track record of service to anthropology.
  • Track record of success in fostering conversation in diverse groups.
  • Proven commitment to an inclusive vision of anthropology.
  • Experience in event planning and management.
  • Self-starter with a high degree of energy and careful attention to detail.
  • Highly flexible, creative problem solver, with a strong ability to multi-task.
  • Excellent oral and written communication skills.
  • Excellent social media skills.
  • Exceptional interpersonal skills.
  • High level of professionalism and demonstrated good judgement.
  • Superb organizational and time management skills.
  • Proficient or advanced skill in Microsoft Suite (Word, Excel, and Outlook).
  • Proficient skill or willingness to learn Salesforce and other event management tools.

 

Compensation

Salary is competitive.  The Foundation provides a generous benefits package, which includes 401(k) plan, health insurance, group term life and disability insurance, paid time off and flexible work arrangements.

 

How to Apply

Applications for the fellowship are being accepted online via Ziprecruiter.com, https://www.ziprecruiter.com/job/ad83eaaf.  You will be asked to upload your curriculum vitae or resume and a letter of interest. In the letter of interest, please comment on how your experience and professional aspirations are a good match for this fellowship.

Applications will be accepted until August 15, 2020.  Due to the expected high volume of applications for the fellowship, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.  The anticipated start date of the fellowship is on or before October 1, 2020.

Acknowledging the precarity faced by many early career anthropologists, the Foundation has designed the fellowship to meet the needs of scholars for whom relocation can be a hardship.  Fellows choose between telecommuting or working at the Foundation’s headquarters in New York City.   Please note that candidates must be authorized to work lawfully in the United States. Wenner-Gren does not provide visa sponsorship for employment.

In Memoriam: Dr. Sydel Silverman

It is with great sorrow that we wish to announce the passing of one of the Wenner-Gren Foundation’s greatest leaders and closest friends.  Sydel Silverman was the president of Wenner-Gren from 1987 to 1999.  She guided the Foundation through a critical phase in its history.  She preserved the small grants program, which provides a crucial source of support for doctoral students and post-doctoral researchers.  She held symposia that set new directions for the field.  She was instrumental in expanding the international community of anthropologists, fostering the creation new professional associations and new conversations that cut across countries and traditions of work.  We still strive to live by the values she cherished and to pursue the priorities she set.   She will be sorely missed.

Read Sydel Silverman’s obituary.

The European Association of Social Anthropologists also published a lovely tribute to Dr. Silverman.

Wenner-Gren at AAA 2018: Schedule of Events

It’s that time of the year again! The 117th annual AAA meeting is about kick off in San Jose, California. If you are planning to attend we’d love to see you at the following events:

Thursday, November 15, 2018

(3-0605) How to Write a Grant Proposal for the Wenner-Gren Foundation and the NSF, 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM, San Jose Convention Center,  MR 114

(3-1038) Out of the Ashes: International Solidarity and the Challenges for Rebuilding Anthropology at Brazil’s National Museum in Rio de Janeiro, 4:15 PM – 6 PM, San Jose Convention Center, Executive Ballroom 210 B

Friday, November 16, 2018

(4-0135) Journalism and Anthropology: An Encounter, 8 – 9:45 AM, San Jose Convention Center, LL 21 C

(4-1185) The Art Of Reviewing, 4:15 PM – 6 PM, San Jose Convention Center, Executive Ballroom 210F

Exhibit Hall Fun!

Meet the Editors of Current Anthropology, Thursday and Friday, November 15th and 16th, 10 AM – 12 PM,  University of Chicago Press Booth #408, San Jose Convention Center Exhibition Hall  Laurence Ralph and Lisa McKamy will be available, and possibly Mark Aldenderfer as well.

Also feel free to drop by to see us at the Wenner-Gren Booth (#211) in the Exhibition Hall. 

In Memoriam: Dr. Ira Berlin

It is with heavy heart that we share the news of the passing of Dr. Ira Berlin on June 5, 2018.  Ira was a beloved member of the Wenner-Gren Foundation Board of Trustees (2008-2018) and Distinguished University Professor in the Department of History at the University of Maryland.  He was a renowned historian revered for his groundbreaking scholarship on slavery and life during its aftermath.

His compassion and commitment to the Wenner-Gren Foundation was steadfast as was his belief in the potential of anthropology to make a difference in the world.  The Foundation is forever grateful for his many contributions and extraordinary friendship over the years, and extends condolences to his family on their loss.

Ira Berlin, transformative historian of slavery in America, dies at 77 – The Washington Post

Upcoming September-October Conferences

A look ahead to what Wenner-Gren is sponsoring in the coming months.

 

Eleventh Conference on Hunting and Gathering Societies (CHAGS 11)

September 7-11, 2015

Vienna, Austria

With the landmark conference “Man the Hunter” in 1966, the study of hunter-gatherer societies became a major topic within the social and human sciences. Since then, some of the topics and concerns – egalitarianism, sharing, and mobility – remain central, while others – such as social and technological evolution – have seen better times. Thus, while scholarly trends change over time, the goal of the initial conference, to establish a unified field of hunter-gatherer studies, is still valid. The general question of CHAGS 11 therefore is how the results of the last 50 years and new research agendas can be utilized for the present and future. While many hunter-gatherers are forced to give up their ways of life and subsistence practices, they figure prominently in public discourses on ecological and ideological alternatives to industrial society. Thus, CHAGS 11 will attempt to attract a variety of stakeholders in these debates – indigenous representatives, NGOs, scholars, etc. Based on fieldwork and research from the full spectrum of hunter-gatherer ways of life and from all perspectives our disciplines have to offer, the goal of CHAGS 11 is to bring hunter-gatherer studies back to the center of the human and social sciences.

 

Modern Man in Northern Africa; Chronology, Behavior and Cultural Heritage

Late October, 2015

Rabat, Morocco

This conference will bring together researchers from Canada, France, Italy, Senegal and Morocco to discuss research concerning the history of modern humans in the Maghreb. Two main subjects will be discussed: chronology and behavior of modern humans since their appearance in the region around 130,000 years ago; and characterization of pigments and colorants using different non-invasive and portable methods in the frame of cultural heritage. The goals of the conference are to establish the state of research in Morocco and reinforce the dialogue between teams working in the country and in the wider world.