Archive for New York Academy of Sciences

NYAS @ WGF 11/17: Audio Now Available

Monday evening saw November’s installment of our popular ongoing lecture series done in conjunction with the anthropology section of the New York Academy of Sciences. Audio from this panel discussion, featuring Daniel Goldstein of Rutgers University and Alyshia Gálvez of Lehman College, CUNY is available here.

NYAS @ WGF 10/27: Audio Now Available!

Left to right: Peter Siegel, Stuart Fiedel, Genese Sodikoff, Brian Boyd

Listen to last week’s New York Academy of Sciences anthropology section lecture featuring Stuart J. Fiedel, Senior Archaeologist at the Louis Berger Group and author of Prehistory of the Americas to discuss the challenges recent genetic, archaeological, and paleological evidence present to attempts to unambiguously document human occupations in the Americas prior to 13,500 BP and “break the Clovis Barrier” followed by comments by discussant Peter Siegel of Montclair State University.

Part 1 (Stuart Fiedel)

Part 2 (Peter Siegel)

NYAS @ WGF 10/27: Is Clovis Still First?

Our popular lecture series rolls on! Join us Monday, October 27, at 7:00 PM as we welcome Stuart J. Fiedel, Senior Archaeologist at the Louis Berger Group and author of Prehistory of the Americas to discuss the challenges recent genetic, archaeological, and paleological evidence present to attempts to unambiguously document human occupations in the Americas prior to 13,500 BP and “break the Clovis Barrier”.

Since the antiquity of the Monte Verde site in southern Chile was certified in 1997, most archaeologists have accepted that peopling of the Americas began more than 14,500 years ago. A few sites in North America also contain artifacts that seem to be older than Clovis fluted points (which date from ca. 13,500 to 12,800 cal yr BP). The Paisley Caves in Oregon have yielded 14,300-year-old coprolites from which human DNA of Native American types has been extracted. These ostensibly early sites have been linked to a model positing multiple early migrations down the Pacific coast. It has even been proposed that Clovis developed from the Solutrean culture of France and Spain (despite the intervening ocean and a temporal gap of 6,000 years). However, all of these pre-Clovis claims remain dubious. The most recent genetic, archaeological, and paleontological evidence shows that: 1) Native North, Central, and South Americans are all descended from a single founding population derived from northern Eurasia; 2) a child of that population was buried with Clovis tools at the Anzick Site in Montana 13,000 years ago; 3) interior Clovis-linked sites are older than any coastal sites; 4) a Clovis-derived population rapidly occupied South America 13,000 years ago; and 5) rapid human expansion caused an ecosystem catastrophe that entailed the extinction of some 80 genera of megafauna.

Fiedel’s talk will be followed by comments by discussant Peter Siegel of Montclair State University.

A reception will precede the meeting at 6:00 pm. Please do not contact the Wenner-Gren Foundation with inquiries regarding registration.

NYAS @ WGF 9/22 – Audio Now Available!

Listen to last Monday’s New York Academy of Sciences meeting lecture, featuring Nina Glick Schiller of the University of Manchester, the Max Planck Institute, and Oxford University.

download

NYAS @ WGF: “Perspectives on ‘Nation Unbound’: The Transnational Migration in the Current Conjuncture”

Our popular lecture series with the New York Academy of Sciences Anthropology Section begins a new season Monday, September 22nd, at 7:00 PM, when we and NYAS welcome Nina Glick Schiller of the University of Manchester, the Max Planck Institute, and Oxford University.

In 1994 in Nations Unbound: Transnational Projects, Postcolonial Dilemmas and the Deterritorialized Nation-State, Linda Basch, Cristina Szanton Blanc and I, three anthropologists, argued for a transnational paradigm for the study of migration. Nations Unbound analyzed the structural contingencies within which and the processes through which increasing numbers of people of migrant background created transnational social fields that connected them to two or more nation-states. In this talk, I will address the ways the transnational migration paradigm was adopted, critiqued or celebrated, the ways in which the initial paradigm spoke to the global historical conjuncture, and the degree to which Nations Unbound speaks to the contemporary global transformations.

A reception will precede the meeting at 6:00 pm. The meeting is free to attend, but registration with NYAS is required. Please do not contact the Wenner-Gren Foundation with inquiries regarding registration.

NYAS @ WGF: Audio Now Available!

Left to Right: Brian Boyd and Genese Sodikoff (Co-Chairs, Anthropology Section, NYAS), Speaker Sarah Croucher (Wesleyan), and Discussant Mandana Limbert (Queens College, CUNY)

Recently we hosted the final New York Academy of Sciences Anthropology Section meeting for the 2013-2014 academic year, deliciously entitled “Capitalism and Cloves: Islamic Plantations on Nineteenth-Century Zanzibar”. Now you can listen to Wesleyan University’s Sarah K. Croucher walk us through race, capitalism, and the complex landscaping of clove plantations, followed by a brief comment by discussant Mandana Limbert of Queens College CUNY.

Listen to the talk, discussant portion, and audience Q&A.

…and thanks again for joining us for another great season of NYAS programming!

NYAS @ WGF: Sarah K. Croucher and “Capitalism and Cloves”

We’ve just had another great season of NYAS Anthropology Section lectures here at the Wenner-Gren Foundation, and this upcoming Monday, April 28th, marks the final meeting for the 2013-2014 academic year. On this occasion we will welcome Wesleyan University’s Sarah K. Croucher, a historical archaeologist focused on race and colonialism in the 19th century, to present a talk entitled “Capitalism and Cloves: Islamic Plantations on Nineteenth-Century Zanzibar”

Plantation landscapes have been understood by historical archaeologists to be fundamentally part of the expansion of global capitalism. This talk explores this taken-for-granted assumption through the study of Islamic plantations on nineteenth-century Zanzibar. Through a combination of archaeological and historical data I explore how landscapes were understood by Omani settler colonists on the island during the 1800s, in the process questioning the manner in which capitalism and European culture are generally assumed to be synonymous.

This event will take place at the Wenner-Gren Foundation Building, 470 Park Avenue South, 8th Floor, New York (at 32nd Street). Dr. Croucher will begin her lecture at 7 PM, and a dinner and wine reception, free to students, will precede the talk at 6 pm. The event is free, but registration with NYAS is required.

NYAS @ WGF 3/24: Audio Now Available!

Left to right: Columbia's Brian Boyd, Daniel Lende, Rutgers' Genese Sodikoff, Rayna Rapp

Monday was the penultimate 2013-14 meeting of the New York Academy of Sciences Anthropology section lecture series at the Wenner-Gren Foundation. We welcomed Daniel Lende of the University of South Florida and the popular PLoS blog Neuroanthropology, and New York University’s Rayna Rapp to discuss Culture and the Brain.

 

Now you can Listen to the audio of the talk and the following Q&A.

April 21st will see the final session of this season’s talks! Stay tuned for further details.

NYAS @ WGF: March Madness Double Feature!

March 2014 is a special month for our annual NYAS Anthropology Section Lecture series, as we’re offering a double-dip of great anthropological programming beginning Friday, March 21, when CUNY Graduate Center hosts Gavin Smith, Professor Emeritus of the University of Toronto. And on the following Monday, March 24, join us at the Wenner-Gren offices for an after-work discussion with New York University’s Rayna Rapp and South Florida’s Daniel Lende on “Culture and the Brain”!

Here are the details:

 

Intellectuals and Counter-Politics: Between Reflexivity and Engagement

Friday, March 21, 2014 | 4:15 PM – 6:00 PM
The Graduate Center, CUNY, Room C415A

Dr. Gavin Smith (University of Toronto) argues that the forms capitalism takes is best seen in terms of the dominance of specific power blocs, rather than as an expression of neoliberalism — either as a form of governance or as a kind of capitalist market ideology. He suggests that in the major social formations the conditions for the reproduction of finance capital have to be secured by the hegemonic strategies of this fraction of capital. As a result, we have seen a shift from a kind of hegemony whose ideological authority rested on expansion through a population configured as ideally homogenous, to a kind of hegemony whose ideological authority rests on selectivity and distinctions among the population. The intellectual task for a philosophy of praxis has three foci: assessment of the conditions of possibility, of the potentialities for popular mobilization, and of appropriate strategic actions — identifying key points of leverage.

 

Culture and the Brain: A Panel Discussion

Monday, March 24, 2014 | 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM

The Wenner-Gren Foundation

Rayna Rapp, New York University — “Big Data, Small Kids”

Dr. Rayna Rapp, in collaboration with Dr. Faye Ginsburg, has recently been examining cultural innovation in special education and the rise of disability consciousness. Together they have carried out fieldwork in scientific laboratories on brain research about learning, memory, childhood psychiatric diagnoses, and epigenetics. In this talk, Dr. Rapp tells the story of how she began tracking one set of scientists in a pediatric neuroscience lab looking at Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Learning Disability (LD), and ended up watching the scientists construct international Big Data coalitions as part of a massive undertaking in brain mapping now ongoing across several continents.

Daniel Lende, University of South Florida — “Hooked on the Brain? On Using Neuroscience in Anthropology”

Dr. Daniel Lende areas of expertise include medical anthropology, the synthesis of biological and cultural anthropology, and applied anthropology. His research centers on behavioral health problems, particularly substance use and abuse. Dr. Lende is the co-founder of the Neuroanthropology blog and co-editor of The Encultured Brain: An Introduction to Neuroanthropology (MIT Press). Neuroanthropology is a new field that draws on neuroscience to examine anthropological questions. Using the case study of addiction, this talk will examine both the promise and peril of such an approach, and demonstrate how effective use of neuroscience requires both synthesis and critique.

 

As always, it is FREE to attend these events, but REGISTRATION WITH NYAS IS REQUIRED. Visit the links provided or contact the New York Academy of Sciences for more information.

NYAS @ WGF: Becky Schulthies Audio Now Available!

Monday evening, the Wenner-Gren Foundation welcomed Dr. Becky Schulthies of Rutgers University to present her talk “Re-registering Moroccans Mediatized Temporalities and the Politics of Recognition in State Storytelling” as the February installment of the New York Academy of Sciences Anthropology Section lecture series.

We are pleased to present an audio recording of the talk and following discussion with Sonia Neela Das of New York University.

Stay tuned to the blog for announcements regarding the next and future installments of the lecture series!

Main lecture / discussant comment

Q&A