Archive for Grant Programs

Engaged Anthropology Grant – Dr. Liubov Golovanova

Dr. Golovanova gives a lecture at Adigeayn State University.

As many of you are aware, our newest grant program is the Engaged Anthropology Grant, a special initiative we began to help anthropologists bring their research “home” to the communities that hosted them during their time in the field. Scholars who have previously been awarded either the Dissertation Fieldwork Grant or the Post-PhD Grant are eligible, with awardees receiving up to $5,000 to return to their fieldsite and share the results of their Wenner-Gren funded project in a productive way with the local community.

The first completed Engaged Anthropology Grant belongs to Post-PhD grantee Dr. Liubov Golovanova of St. Petersburg’s Labratory of Prehistory, who received funding in 2009 to aid research on ““The Study of Settlement Dynamics in the Middle/Upper Paleolithic in Northwestern Caucasus”. Below is the report prepared by Dr. Golovanova, as per the requirements of the Engaged Anthropology Grant.

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Institutional Development Grant awarded to Addis Ababa University

image courtesy wikimedia commons

Congratulations to the department of social anthropology at Addis Ababa University of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, the latest recipient of the Wenner-Gren Foundation’s Institutional Development Grant program. This renewable grant — providing $25,000 per year for up to five years — will support the continued development of an undergraduate and graduate program in anthropology. To learn more about AAU, anthropology in Ethiopia, and the award, we spoke to Dr. Adugna Tufa Fekadu.

 

First can you tell us a bit about yourself and how you came to be interested in anthropology? Who have been the anthropologists that have most influential in your own personal formation and why?

I graduated in History in 1999. Soon I joined the Department of History at Dilla University, in Southern Ethiopia, to teach History. It was that time that I read Asmarom Legesse’s book: Gada: Three Approaches to the Study of African Society. This book, which changed the direction of my future academic life from History to Social Anthropology, analyzes three anthropological schools by using age and generational system among the Oromo of Ethiopia. The next year I had to abandon my job at the Department of History and joined a private college in Addis Ababa, the capital city, where the only Department of Sociology and Anthropology was found. In 2001 I registered to study Masters Degree in Social Anthropology and upon successful completion of the master’s program I joined the Max-Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Germany for a PhD. Numerous anthropologists from Addis Ababa University to Max-Planck Institute for Social Anthropology have contributed in moulding my academic career.

 

Professor Brigitta Benzing, expatriate staff from Germany, discussing with her PhD students in a class room. Image courtesy interviewee

Can you tell us a little about anthropology in Ethiopia? What are the pressing questions and concerns for the discipline there?

Anthropology was started as an academic program in Ethiopia in 1990 when the then Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology at Addis Ababa University in cooperation with Christian Michelsen Institute of Norway opened Masters program in Social Anthropology. In the last decade, more than ten universities started anthropology at Undergraduate and Master’s levels, which indicates the demand. The central focus of anthropology in Ethiopia is describing, analyzing and documenting multiple socio-cultural dynamisms in the country. The key concern for anthropology in particular and for social sciences in general is how to emerge as a strong discipline that produce competent scholars in the political environment that visibly favours natural sciences and technology.

 

Is anthropology a subject that attracts students in Ethiopia?

In Ethiopia, anthropology has fairly a great demand. As I mentioned above, in the last decade more than ten public universities opened a Department of Anthropology. In fact, entrance to our PhD program, which is the only program in a country of eighty three million people, is very competitive.

 

Can you tell us about your department, its specialities and how the award will help your department as it moves forward?

The Department of Social Anthropology at Addis Ababa University has three programs: Undergraduate, MA and PhD. In all the three programs currently the department has 350 students, and sixteen instructors (ten PhD, including expatriates, and six MA).  Of the four sub-disciplines of anthropology, our department concentrates on Social Anthropology. Research interests of the faculty members and students emphasize on ethnohistory, development anthropology, medical anthropology, ecological anthropology, urban anthropology etc.

We are very much grateful to Wenner-Gren Foundation for this Institutional Development Grant. This grant will enable us to improve the theoretical and methodological training of Ph.D students; intensify international exposure and exchange; improve the quality of anthropological training by bringing in experienced senior professors from Europe and America; upgrade the current curriculum in consultation with partner institutions; provide modest support for student field research; and build up library and electronic resources.

Edmore Chitukutuku is the 2013 Wadsworth African Fellow!

Each year, the Wenner-Gren Foundation awards the Wadsworth African Fellowship to an African student to receive a international-level anthropological education at a South African university. We would like to extend our congratulations to the recipient of the 2013 fellowship, Edmore Chitukutuku of Zimbabwe, who will be pursuing a doctoral degree at Johannesburg’s University of Witwatersrand. Today we welcome Edmore as a guest-blogger to tell us a little more about his background and his future in anthropology.

I was born in Bindura, Zimbabwe in 1981. I hold a Bachelor of Social Science degree in Anthropology and Sociology from Great Zimbabwe University (2007) and a B.A. Honours (2011) and M.A. (2013) from Witwatersrand. I have worked for an international organization CARE INTERANTIONAL as a humanitarian field officer, Assistant Lecturer at the Great Zimbabwe University. I have been a Sessional lecturer in the department of Anthropology at The University of Witwatersrand in 2011 as well as in the International Human Rights Exchange Programme department in 2012.

My research interests are in understanding political violence as a complex social phenomenon in society. I am also interested in healing and reconciliation in the aftermath of political conflicts. My Honours, and Masters research have tried to make sense of political violence in rural Zimbabwe through understanding rural life and livelihoods. My Ph.D. research will continue to understand youth militia violence in rural Zimbabwe.

The University of Witwatersrand has been a university of choice to me because of the diversity it offers in anthropology. Wits University’s anthropology department has accomplished academics and researchers who have helped me to understand why anthropologists ask the questions they do and to get the interrelations of our scholarship with the questions that we face every day as citizens and as members of organizations and communities. This environment has further enhanced my genuine interest in thinking about the terms in which we can understand the organization of social and political life. The wits anthropology department hosts a colloquia presentation seminar every week where they invite scholars from all over the world to present and debate in emerging research and academic issues around the globe. The seminar offers a brilliant academic engagement forum that refreshes and enlightens our understanding of social phenomenon.

Congratulations to you, Edmore! To learn more about this program, visit our Programs page.

Engaged Anthropology Grant: Deadline February 1st

As the February 1st application deadline approaches we’d like to remind you of the Foundation’s newest grant program: the Engaged Anthropology Grant.

This program is designed to enable past Wenner-Gren grantees to return to their research locale to share their research results with the community in which the research was conducted, and/or the academic/anthropological community in the region or country of research.  There are two application deadlines per year, February 1 and August 1, and the grant will provide up to $5,000 for expenses directly related to these activities.

To be eligible to apply for the Engaged Anthropology Grant, you must have already received a Wenner-Gren Dissertation Fieldwork or Post-Ph.D. Research Grant, and the proposed engagement activities must be a direct outgrowth of this research.   Applications for each deadline are only accepted within five years of the approval date of the original Wenner-Gren Grant.  Applicants also must have completed their Dissertation Fieldwork or Post-Ph.D. Research Grant and fulfilled all final reporting requirements before being eligible to apply.  Former Dissertation Fieldwork grantees must also have received their Ph.D. before the grant is awarded. Applicants who were awarded an Engaged Anthropology Grant last season will not be eligible to apply for a different engagement project tied to the same Dissertation Fieldwork or Post-Ph.D. Research Grant.

Everyone at Wenner-Gren is excited about this new program and its potential to facilitate continued engagement of our grantees in their research area and to ensure that the results of the research are shared locally in the most appropriate manner.

We hope that you will be equally excited about the Engaged Anthropology Grant. For more information about this program and how to apply, please visit this page.

November 1 Grant Deadline Extended to November 5

Because of Hurricane Sandy, the Foundation will be closed until power is restored in Lower Manhattan. We are all safe, but our servers are down, e-mail is not getting through and there is no one available to answer your phone questions. However, it is still possible to submit your applications through our online system. To help applicants in the hurricane affected area of the East Coast, we have extended the application deadline until November 5 for all applicants. We hope to be able to re-open the Foundation by the end of this week. Please check the website for further updates.

Leslie Aiello
President, Wenner-Gren Foundation

New Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowships for 2012

Richard C. Hunt, President of the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, 1941-1954

Distinct from our other grant programs, the Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship is strictly provided for the writing-up of research already performed by the recipient, allowing up to $40,000 to be used towards twelve months of continuous writing.

This year we’re pleased to announce four new fellows:

Anand, Dr. Nikhil. Haverford College, Haverford, PA – To aid research and writing on ‘Infrapolitics: Public Systems and the Social Life of Water in Mumbai’

Fogelin, Dr. Lars Edward. U. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ – To aid research and writing on ‘An Archaeological History of Indian Buddhism’

Muehlmann, Dr. Shaylih Ryan. U. of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada – To aid research and writing on ‘When I Wear My Alligator Boots: Narcotrafficking In The US-Mexico Borderlands’

Tassi, Dr. Nico. University College London, London, UK – To aid research and writing on ‘Reassembling The Economic: The Aymara Economic System in the Global Arena’

We’d like to take the opportunity to congratulate these scholars, as well as the nearly 100 others who have received a Wenner-Gren grant so far in 2012!

Introducing the Engaged Anthropology Grant

The Wenner-Gren Foundation is pleased to announce a new grant program: the Engaged Anthropology Grant.

This program is designed to enable past Wenner-Gren grantees to return to their research locale to share their research results with the community in which the research was conducted, and/or the academic/anthropological community in the region or country of research.  There will be two application deadlines per year, February 1 and August 1, and the grant will provide up to $5,000 for expenses directly related to these activities.

To be eligible to apply for the Engaged Anthropology Grant, you must have already received a Wenner-Gren Dissertation Fieldwork or Post-Ph.D. Research Grant, and the proposed engagement activities must be a direct outgrowth of this research.   Applications for each deadline are only accepted within five years of the approval date of the original Wenner-Gren Grant.  Applicants also must have completed their Dissertation Fieldwork or Post-Ph.D. Research Grant and fulfilled all final reporting requirements before being eligible to apply.  Former Dissertation Fieldwork grantees must also have received their Ph.D. before the grant is awarded.

Everyone at Wenner-Gren is excited about this new program and its potential to facilitate continued engagement of our grantees in their research area and to ensure that the results of the research are shared locally in the most appropriate manner.

We hope that you will be equally excited about the Engaged Anthropology Grant and take advantage of the unique opportunity it offers. For more information about this program and how to apply, visit our programs page. You may also contact our Program Administrator, Mark Ropelewski, with additional questions at: mropelewski@wennergren.org.

Albino Jopela is the 2012 Wadsworth African Fellow

We would like to extend our congratulations to Albino Pereira de Jesus Jopela, the recipient of the 2012 Wadsworth African Fellowship. An archaeologist, Jopela will be continuing his studies at South Africa’s University of Witwatersrand concerning cultural-heritage management in southern Africa.

I was born in 1982 in Maputo, Mozambique. My research is focused on issues of conservation and management systems of Heritage, especially in relation to rock art sites in Mozambique and southern Africa. I received my BA Honours in History (2006) from Eduardo Mondlane University (Mozambique); a BA Honours (2007) and Masters Degree (2010) in Archaeology from the University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa). My Masters dissertation looked at traditional custodianship practises for archaeological sites in southern African heritage management and considered how the social context of heritage management has changed. This research uncovered the mismatch between public policy makers (formal heritage management systems) and local communities’ perceptions (traditional custodianship systems) in terms of the meanings and notions of ‘heritage’ (e.g. the value and meaning of rock art for contemporary African communities). My PhD research at the Department of Archaeology and the Rock Art Research Institute (RARI) at the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) is a direct outgrowth of this research. I have chosen Wits University for my PhD training because Wits is a worldwide recognized institution for its research on Palaeo-archaeology, the Stone Age, pre-colonial farming and herding societies and the formation of modern cultural identities in the last 500 years. RARI is one of the world’s largest specialised rock art institutions and has over 25 years of expertise in rock art survey, recording, interpretation and management.

I hold a permanent position as Archaeologist and lecturer at the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at Eduardo Mondlane University (Mozambique). I am also the Director of the undergraduate programme for Archaeology and an active collaborator with the National Directorate for Cultural Heritage of Mozambique, which is responsible for advising on policies and strategies regarding the conservation and management of cultural immovable heritage in the country. I have also worked as a UNESCO Consultant on missions in Mozambique and Angola.

Interested in Jopela and his work? Reach out to him on LinkedIn.

For more information on the Wadsworth African Fellowship and the rest of our grant programs, please visit our Programs page.

Wenner-Gren Grantees make anthropologyworks’ “Best Dissertations of 2011″

Recently the blog anthropologyworks, managed by George Washington University professor of anthropology Barbara Miller, released a list of their favorite dissertation projects in Cultural Anthropology for 2011. We are pleased to announce that seven Wenner-Gren grantees made the list!

  • Botswana as a Living Experiment, by Betsey Brada. The University of Chicago. Advisors: Jean Comaroff, Judith Farquhar, Susan Gal, Joseph Masco.
  • La Violencia Adentro (Violence in the Interior): Gender Violence, Human Rights, and State-NGO-Community Relations in Coastal Ecuador, by Karin Friederic. The University of Arizona. Advisors: Linda B. Green, Mark Nichter, Laura Briggs, Martha Few, et al.
  • Small City Neighbors: Race, Space, and Class in Mansfield, Ohio, by Alison Goebel. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Advisors: Alejandro Lugo, Brenda Farnell, Ellen Moodie, David R. Roediger.
  • Being Closer: Children and Caregiving in the Time of TB and HIV in Lusaka, Zambia, by Jean Hunleth. Northwestern University. Advisors: Karen Tranberg Hansen, Helen Schwartzman, William Leonard, Rebecca Wurtz.
  • After SARS: The Rebirth of Public Health in China’s “City of Immigrants,” by Katherine Mason. Harvard University. Advisor: Arthur Kleinman.
  • Landscapes of Power: An Ethnography of Energy Development on the Navajo Nation, by Dana Powell. University of North Carolina. Advisors: Dorothy Holland, Arturo Escobar, Orin Starn, Peter Redfield.
  • The Weight of the Body: Changing Ideals of Fatness, Nourishment, and Health in Guatemala, by Emily Yates-Doerr. New York University. Advisors: Emily Martin, Thomas A. Abercrombie, Rayna Rapp, Sally E. Merry.

Congratulations to all of the authors, and thanks to anthropologyworks for running one of the best anthropology blogs on the web.

Wenner- Gren’s Institutional Development Grant Awarded to National University of Vietnam – Hanoi

part of a group discussion between doctoral students from the National University of Singapore with students from students from the National University of Vietnam-Hanoi. (Photo Supplied by Professor Van Suu Nguyen)

Congratulations to the Department of Anthropology, National University of Vietnam-Hanoi, recipient of the 2011 Institutional Development Grant. This renewable grant — providing $25,000 per year for up to five years — will enable the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at the University, which currently has an active undergraduate and Masters level program.  Peek below the cut for an interview Professor Van Suu Nguyen on the department and the state of anthropology in his country.

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