Oct 28th: Always Already Active: A Conversation with Johnnetta B. Cole

On Thursday, October 28th, 7:00 PM EDT, the Association of Black Anthropologists will be hosting a conversation with Dr. Johnnette B. Cole.

Come join us in an inter-generational conversation about the impact and importance of Dr. Johnnette B. Cole’s new book Racism in American Public Life: A Call to Action. This event will feature graduate student Lexi Ligon and Professors Riché Barnes and Lynn Bolles. Everyone is welcome, even if you haven’t read the book.

To register to for this event click here.

 

Webinar Nov. 4th: Beyond Extractivism: Toward New Collaborative Futures in Anthropology

On November 4th, 12:00 PM EDT, the Wenner-Gren Foundation will be hosting, “Beyond Extractivism: Toward New Collaborative Futures in Anthropology”.

To register for this even click here.

This webinar explores collaborative knowledge production in relation to a stance of responsibility and accountability to the communities with whom we work (including scholarly communities), and to the communities that surround our institutional spaces, cities, territories and regions. What kind of anthropology emerges when collaboration, rather than individualist extraction is upheld as a model?

Panelists:

Carmen Rial, PhD, Professor, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina

Ndukuyakhe Ndlovu, PhD, Manager for Archaeology at South African National Parks and Senior Lecturer at the University of Pretoria

Yasmeen Arif, PhD, Professor, Shiv Nadar University

Christen Smith, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Texas at Austin

Justin Hosbey, PhD, Assistant Professor, Emory University

Moderated by:

Gustavo Lins Ribeiro, PhD, Professor, Metropolitan Autonomous University

CART captioning will be provided.

Organized by the Association of Black Anthropologists, Anthropology Southern Africa, and the Center for Experimental Ethnography

Oct. 27th: Graduate School Application Workshop

Could graduate school be for you? What makes a strong application? On October 27th at 4:00 PM ET, come join our Zoom Workshop on applying to graduate school in archaeology. To register for this event click here.

Topics covered will include:

Thinking about graduate school: Where? What type of program? How do I apply?

Preparing for graduate school: Courses to take, how to get fieldwork experience.

Money matters: How do you pay for graduate school?

Panelists include professors Zoë Crossland (Columbia), Andrew Bauer (Stanford), Peter van Dommelen (Brown) and Michael Galaty (Michigan).

NYAS Lecture 10/4: Criminalizing Care and Neglect in Sexual Assault Sentencing: Race and Punishment in Milwaukee, WI

On Monday, October 4th, 6:30 PM EDT, the New Academy of Sciences will host, “Criminalizing Care and Neglect in Sexual Assault Sentencing: Race and Punishment in Milwaukee, WI.”

To register for this event click here.

This event will also be streamed on Youtube.

This talk examines the role of care in the U.S. courts, particularly as it is scrutinized during the sentencing of people who have been convicted of sexual assault. In the course of a trial or a hearing, judges, attorneys, and witnesses often appeal to particular notions of community and public good. These forms of community are predicated on the recognition of particular forms of care, while they fail to see or even condemn others, often along lines of race. As testimony emerges, courts cultivate a worldview that casts suspicion on what the court perceives as Black kinship, community, and household. Sentencing decisions are embedded in whether the court imagines the community as a place where care and rehabilitation can take place. In the absence of the court’s ability to imagine community-based care, sentences relegate prisoners to in-custody imprisonment in the name of punishment, rehabilitation, and deterrence. Drawing on fieldwork from Milwaukee County felony courts, this talk works through the entangling of race, power, and sexuality driving the ways in which community emerges and is reconfigured in the courts. These processes are driven by the court’s politics of race, the narrowing of pathways for sexual assault survivors to attain justice, the production of courtroom spectacle, and the crisis of mass incarceration.

FEATURED SPEAKER

Dr. Sameena Mulla is Acting Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Emory University. Her work examines the intersections of legal and medical approaches in U.S. interventions into sexual violence, and the ways in which they are invested in regimes of gender, race, and power. In particular, her research maintains a focus on the ways in which healthcare, law, and policing configure sexual violence as a social and political wound.

She was recognized with the American Anthropological Association and Society for Applied Anthropology’s Margaret Mead Award in 2017 for her first book, The Violence of Care: Rape Victims, Forensic Nurses, and Sexual Assault Intervention (New York University Press, 2014). The book was also awarded an honorable mention in the Eileen Basker Prize competition recognizing works making significant contributions to scholarship on gender and health. Her second book, a collaborative ethnography with Heather Hlavka, Bodies in Evidence: Race, Gender, Science and Sexual Assault Adjudication will be published in November 2021.

The Violence of Care examines emergency-room based sexual assault intervention in Baltimore, Maryland, showing how therapeutic projects and investigative goals are conflated and complicated in forensic nursing examinations. Bodies in Evidence follows the evidence collected during forensic examinations to stages of adjudication, this time in a Milwaukee, Wisconsin felony court. In the courts, it becomes clear that while questions of justice are often left unresolved, the science of the courts contributes to collective investments in and material production of gender, sexuality, and racial hierarchy.

She has also written articles that were published in journals such as Medical Anthropology, Law and Society Review, and Gender and Society.

DISCUSSANT

Dr. April Petillo
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Northern Arizona University

Webinar Sept. 28th: Proposal Writing for the Wenner-Gren Foundation: Dissertation Fieldwork and Post-PhD Research Grants

Join us on September 28th at 7AM and 7PM Eastern Time, for, “Proposal Writing for the Wenner-Gren Foundation: Dissertation Fieldwork and Post-PhD Research Grant”.

To register for the 7AM workshop click here.

To register for the 7PM workshop click here.

In 2021, the world still feels like a precarious place. The Covid pandemic is far from over, with vaccine apartheid and resistance and the emergence of new variants threatening populations around the world. Racial injustice, economic inequality, climate catastrophe — none of these things have gone away. These realities are reshaping anthropological practice. Whether or not you are studying these pressing issues, they form the context for your work. Join Danilyn Rutherford, President of the Wenner-Gren Foundation, for a discussion of proposal writing in these tumultuous times. She’ll describe the Foundation’s approach to supporting anthropology worldwide, offer tips on succeeding in the competition for Dissertation Fieldwork and Post-PhD Research Grants, and describe some of the Foundation’s new initiatives. There will be lots of time for questions.

September 28th 7AM Eastern Workshop:

September 28th 7PM Eastern Workshop: 

CART captioning for the 7AM workshop will be provided by Wendy Baquerizo.

CART captioning for the 7PM workshop will be provided by Jordan Mucha.

Webinar Sept. 23rd: Toward Radical Humanism in Anthropology: Ethnographic Praxis, Relationality, Multi-Modality

On September 23rd, 12:00 PM Eastern Time, the Wenner-Gren Foundation will be hosting, “Toward Radical Humanism in Anthropology: Ethnographic Praxis, Relationality, Multi-Modality”.

To register for this event click here.

In this panel, we explore artistic modalities and co-laboring as ways of knowing that offer a multi-modal attunement without pinning down or leaning on a redemptive ‘truth’. The panelists offer reflections and performances that attend to institutional and epistemic violence reproduced in the academy, state or extra/judicial systems. We look to spaces and ways of making knowledge differently that challenge us to reimagine ways of being together and collaborate in research; modes of knowing that refuse and unsettle the ‘comforts’ provided by established canons of what constitutes ‘good’ research methods, conceptual conceits and community entanglements. We reflect on praxis, reciprocity, and esthetic engagements as ways of being and knowing in this particular moment of reckoning with liberal academic discourses on anti-racism and decolonization.

Panelists:

Aimee Cox, PhD, Associate Professor, Yale University

Peter Morin (Tahltan Nation), Associate Professor, OCAD University

Ayumi Goto, PhD, Adjunct professor, OCAD University

Marlon Swai, PhD, Lecturer, University of Cape Town

Dara Culhane, PhD, Professor, Simon Fraser University

Moderated by:

Erin Baines, PhD, Associate Professor, Transformative Memory Project, University of British Columbia

Pilar Riaño-Alcalá, PhD, Professor, Social Justice Institute, University of British Columbia

CART captioning will be provided.

Organized by the Association of Black Anthropologists, Anthropology Southern Africa, the Center for Experimental Ethnography, and the Transformative Memory Network

Survey Time! An Investigation of the Demographics and Processes of Research Funding in U.S. Academic Anthropology

We invite you to participate in a research study titled “An Investigation of the Demographics and Processes of Research Funding in U.S. Academic Anthropology,” led by Dr. Laura Heath-Stout.

The purpose of the study is to understand the demographics of anthropology and how they shape decisions about research projects and funding applications. The study will use this information to evaluate the equity of granting agencies’ processes of soliciting applications, reviewing proposals, and making funding decisions.

You are eligible to participate if you have been a member of any of the following organizations at any time in 2016–2021: American Anthropological Association: American Association of Physical/Biological Anthropologists, American Board of Forensic Anthropology, American Society of Primatologists, Archaeological Institute of America, Register of Professional Archaeologists, Society for American Archaeology, Society for Apply Anthropology, Society for Historical Archaeology, Society of Forensic Anthropologists.

Participation is completely voluntary and does not affect your current or future funding decisions. If you consent to participate, you will be invited to fill out an anonymous survey (approximately 35 questions) related to your demographic identities, research, and experience applying grants or fellowships, if any.

We are inviting members of several professional organizations to complete the survey: we apologize if you have received this message multiple times and ask that you only fill out the survey once. If you are interested in participating, please click here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/anthfundingsm.

Open-Rank Position in Linguistic Anthropology at the University of Chicago

Open-rank position in linguistic anthropology
Department of Anthropology, University of Chicago
2021–22

Position Description

The Department of Anthropology at the University of Chicago invites applications for an open rank position in linguistic anthropology, to begin as early as July 1, 2022.

We welcome applications from linguistic anthropologists whose empirical, field-based research is grounded in social theory and speaks to questions of broad anthropological significance. We are interested in candidates whose scholarship expands linguistic and semiotic approaches to language and communicative practice, with particular interest in linguistic anthropologists whose research intersects with the study of indigeneity, gender and sexuality, or critical informatics and new media. We seek a candidate eager to participate in the Department’s and University’s academic community. The successful candidate will teach in their area of research, contribute to the linguistic anthropology curriculum, and help strengthen ties between the subfield and other disciplines.

Application Instructions

Applicants are expected to have the PhD in hand by the start of appointment. Applications should include: (1) a current curriculum vitae, including the names and contact information of at least three referees; (2) a cover letter that describes your research and teaching profile, as well as your professional plan for the next 3–5 year period; (3) a research statement addressing current research and future plans for research; (4) a teaching statement addressing teaching experience and philosophy; (5) a sample of scholarly writing. Those applying for a tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant Professor should include one writing sample, such as a dissertation chapter, journal article, or book chapter. Applicants for a tenured position at the rank of Associate or Full Professor should include two writing samples, such as journal articles or book chapters.

Applicants should apply online at the University of Chicago Academic Career Opportunities website at apply.interfolio.com/92756.

Review of applicants will begin by November 1, 2021; applications will be reviewed until the position is filled or the search has closed.

Equal Employment Opportunity Statement

We seek a diverse pool of applicants who wish to join an academic community that places the highest value on rigorous inquiry and encourages diverse perspectives, experiences, groups of individuals, and ideas to inform and stimulate intellectual challenge, engagement, and exchange.The University’s Statements on Diversity are at https://provost.uchicago.edu/statements-diversity.

The University of Chicago is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity/Disabled/Veterans Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national or ethnic origin, age, status as an individual with a disability, protected veteran status, genetic information, or other protected classes under the law. For additional information please see the University’s Notice of Nondiscrimination.

Job seekers in need of a reasonable accommodation to complete the application process should call 773-702-1032 or email equalopportunity@uchicago.edu with their request.

 

Take Part – Survey Sponsored by Wenner-Gren, Society of Black Archaeologists, Indigenous Archaeology Collective and More!

The Wenner-Gren Foundation, in collaboration with the Society of Black Archaeologists, the Indigenous Archaeology Collective, and a group of major anthropology funders, is sponsoring a survey.  It’s designed to provide as complete a portrait as possible of who today’s anthropologists are, how they fund their research, and what factors determine who gets supported and who does not.  Focused on North America, the survey is part of a broader initiative designed to promote greater equity in our field. All the major anthropological associations based in the US are participating in this phase of the project; we hope to collaborate with colleagues in other world regions in future research.   You’ll be receiving a link from your professional association that leads to the survey.  Please take a moment to fill it out!