Announcing the Recipients of the Rapid-Response Grants on Covid-19 and the Social Sciences

The Wenner-Gren Foundation, in collaboration with the Social Science Research Council, the Ford Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, is proud to announce the recipients of Rapid-Response Grants on Covid-19 and the Social Sciences.  Below is a list of the projects funded by Wenner-Gren, all of which were proposed by anthropologists and scholars in closely related fields. For a full list of recipients and further information about this program, please visit the SSRC website.

Covid-19 Messaging and Youth Engagements on TikTok

Crystal Abidin, Senior Research Fellow, Internet Studies, Curtin University

Enduring Social Inequalities: Black Communities’ Responses to the “Covid-19 Crisis” in Brazil, Colombia and Kenya

Jaime Alves, Assistant Professor, Department of Black Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara

Raquel de Souza, Researcher, Federal University of Bahia

Wangui Kimari, Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Cape Town

Amanda Pinheiro, Doctoral Student, University of California, Santa Barbara

Terrance Wooten, Assistant Professor, University of California, Santa Barbara

Humor as a Semiotic Resource: Coping with Covid-19 Stress in Africa

Bassey Antia, Professor, Linguistics, University of the Western Cape

Sinfree Makoni, Associate Professor, Pennsylvania State University

Occupational Diseases in the Context of Pandemic: Managing Risk and Care among the Working-Class Households

Basak Can, Assistant Professor, Sociology Department, Koç University

Zeynel Gul, PhD Candidate, Johns Hopkins University

A People’s History of the Pandemic: Global Households and Covid-19 in Asia

Cathryn Clayton, Associate Professor and Chair, Asian Studies Program, University of Hawaii at Manoa

The Impacts of Covid-19 on Community-Based Maternal Health Projects

Haile Cole, Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut

Containment and Distrust: Impacts of Covid-19 responses and historical containment on city making from below in Nairobi

Anders Ese, Head of Research and Development, Urban-A

Romola Sanyal, Associate Professor of Urban Geography, London School of Economics and Political Science

Joseph Mukeku, Community Design Architect & Affordable Housing Specialist, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology

Benjamin Sidori, Research Assistant, Urban-A

Queering the Surveillance Assemblage: Covid-19 and Homophobia in South Korea

Timothy Gitzen, Postdoctoral Fellow, Society of Fellows in the Humanities, University of Hong Kong

Wonkeun Chun, Research Professor, Sookmyung Women’s University

Re/defining “Essential Work”: The Impact of the Covid-19 Pandemic on Venezuelan Migrants in Argentina

Mariya Ivancheva, School of Histories, Languages, and Cultures, University of Liverpool

Jésica Lorena Pla, Permanent Research Fellow, Research Institute Gino Germani, University of Buenos Aires

Lockdown Diaries: Pandemic Stories from the Field

Ann Laudati, Instructor of Human-Environmental Geography, Department of Geography, University of California, Berkeley

Charlotte Mertens, Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Melbourne

Stephanie Perazzone, Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Antwerp

Re-Imagining Social Futures:  Lessons from Diverse Household Experiences during a Global Pandemic

Marjorie Faulstich Orellana, Professor, School of Education and Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles

Well-Being in a Time of Social Distancing: Indonesian Domestic Workers in Singapore and Hong Kong

Dyah Pitaloka, Research Scholar, Ronin Institute for Independent Scholarship

Frenia Nababan, Lecturer, Universitas Multimedia Nusantara

Governing the Pandemic: Relief and Resilience in Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Maya Ratnam, Assistant Professor, School of Arts and Sciences, Ahmedabad University

Stigma Syndemics and End-Stage Kidney Disease in Disenfranchised Urban Communities Fighting Covid-19

Merav Shohet, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, College of Arts and Sciences, Boston University

Insa Marie Schmidt, Postdoctoral Researcher, Boston University

Lauren Dana Stern, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Boston University

Mapping Daily Routines, Rituals, and Virtual Emotional Intimacies in Covid-19 Pakistan

Zujaja Wahaj, Assistant Professor, International Business and Marketing, NUST Business School, National University of Sciences and Technology

Oliver Kayas, Senior Lecturer in Business Information Systems, Manchester Metropolitan University Business School

Asfia Obaid, Assistant Professor, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad

Lubaba Sadaf, Assistant Professor, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad

“Invisible Monsters”: The Pandemic Imaginary of Infectious Pathogens and Infectious Bodies

Lisa Wynn, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Macquarie University

Thomas Strong, Lecturer, Maynooth University

Susanna Trnka, Associate Professor, University of Auckland

 

NYAS Lecture 9/21: Making your Research Make a Difference: Designing a Strategy to Engage the Public with Social Media

On September 21st the New York Academy of Sciences will be hosting a webinar entitled, “Making your Research Make a Difference: Designing a Strategy to Engage the Public with Social Media”. Kristina Baines, Associate Professor at Guttman Community College, “Director of Anthropology” at Cool Anthropology, and Victoria Costa, Creative Technologist, “Director of Cool” at Cool Anthropology will be speaking. Baird Campbell, Public Scholarship Graduate Assistant at Cool Anthropology, and Hannia Delgado, Social Media Manager at Cool Anthropology will be co-facilitating.

The lecture will begin at 6:30 EST. Click here to register.

A live stream will be on Facebook and YouTube.

Social media platforms can be both a democratizing force and a dismissive space, simultaneously making research accessible and applicable to a wide audience while also rendering it reductive and dangerously generalized. In this workshop participants will develop a step-by-step plan to engage a wide audience with their research and applied projects without compromising rigor or grounded discussion. With the often complicated power dynamics inherent in Anthropology, to remain silent about political matters is, in itself, a political act. It is increasingly urgent that anthropologists think of themselves as engaged citizens, not simply researchers and practitioners. This workshop invites participants to expand their perspective on how their work is relevant to the public, and helps build the toolkit required to reach people outside of our discipline.

About the Speakers:

Kristina Baines is a sociocultural anthropologist with an applied medical/environmental focus. Her research interests include indigenous ecologies, health, and heritage in the context of global change, in addition to publicly engaged research and dissemination practices. She is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the City University of New York (CUNY), Guttman Community College, and the Director of Anthropology for Cool Anthropology.

Victoria Costa is a creative innovator who leverages her skills in design thinking, program management, technology and collective action to build community around projects supporting more just societies. Her interests include social permaculture, rethinking education and breaking down the walls of academia to provide wide access to research ideas. She is co-founder and principal strategist at Cool Anthropology, research scholar at the Ronin Institute, and serves on the advisory board of the Oglala Lakota Economic and Cultural Revitalization Initiative (OLCERI).

Wenner-Gren Proposal Writing Webinar: Funding Anthropological Research in the Age of Covid-19

Join Danilyn Rutherford, the President of the Wenner-Gren Foundation, along with other Wenner-Gren staff members, for a discussion of how to seek funding for your research in these tumultuous times. Danilyn will discuss everything from changes to the application questions to the meaning and ethics of research at a moment when anthropologists and those affected by their work are facing enormous challenges. She will also describe some of the new programs Wenner-Gren is launching to advance anthropological knowledge, amplify the impact of anthropology, address the precarity of anthropology and anthropologists, and promote an inclusive vision of the field. There will be lots of time for questions.

To register click on one of the following links:

Wednesday, September 23 at 8:00 AM (Pacific)https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_RiyCMtY3SQSCq84RjcckJg 

CART captioning for this event by Gay Cordova.

Wednesday, September 23 at 7:00 PM (Pacific)https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Ga0H7fWDSOyLjJWlVBXHhA

CART captioning for this event by Lori Yeager Stavropoulos.

A livestream of this webinar will be available on the Foundation’s Vimeo page.

Webinar: Reclaiming the Ancestors: Indigenous and Black Perspectives on Repatriation, Human Rights, and Justice

On Wednesday, September 2nd the Wenner-Gren Foundation co-sponsored the webinar, “Reclaiming the Ancestors: Indigenous and Black Perspectives on Repatriation, Human Rights, and Justice”.

Over the last several centuries, Indigenous, Black, and other colonized peoples’ remains have been turned into objects of study for archaeologists, anthropologists, and other scientists. This can be seen most clearly in the collection of their ancestors, often excavated from cemeteries and burial grounds and taken to museums around the world. Today, more than 100,000 Native American ancestral remains are still held in U.S. public museums alone, while an unknown number of remains of people of African descent are stored in museum collections.

What does it mean to turn human beings into artifacts? What happens to the living communities who lose control and ownership over their own ancestors and heritage? In exploring these questions, this panel will discuss how repatriation–the process of reclaiming and returning ancestral and human remains–can address inequality. The discussion will further ask how repatriation might encourage a reckoning with the colonial violence experienced by Native and Black Americans in the past, which still reverberates in the injustice their descendants face today. Bringing together Indigenous and Black voices, this panel discussion finds common ground in the struggle for repatriation and assertion of sovereignty and human rights.

Panelists:

Michael Blakey, PhD, NEH Professor, College of William and Mary

Dorothy Lippert (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma), PhD, Tribal Liaison, National Museum of Natural History

Shannon Martin (Gun Lake Pottawatomi/Ojibwe), Director, Ziibiwing Center of Anishinabe Culture & Lifeways

Rachel Watkins, PhD, Associate Professor, American University

Moderated by Sonya Atalay (Anishinabe-Ojibwe), PhD, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst

CART captioning by Lori Yeager Stavropoulos

Sponsored by the Society of Black Archaeologists, Indigenous Archaeology Collective, Peabody Institute of Archaeology, Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies, Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, and SAPIENS

Webinar: The Case for Letting Anthropology Burn? Race, Racism, and Its Reckoning in American Anthropology

Join us on September 23rd at 2:00 PM PST/5:00 PM EST for “The Case for Letting Anthropology Burn? Race, Racism, and Its Reckoning in American Anthropology”, a webinar sponsored by the UCLA Department of Anthropology Race, Racism, Policing and State Violence Committee and the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research.

To register for this event click here.

Moderators: Kamari M. Clarke & Deborah Thomas

Introduction by Danilyn Rutherford, President, Wenner-Gren Foundation

Lucia Cantero, Assistant Professor of International Studies, University of San Francisco

Ryan Jobson, Neubauer Family Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of Chicago

Chris Loperena, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, CUNY Graduate Center

Jonathan Rosa, Associate Professor of Education, Stanford University

Savannah Shange, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Cruz

Zoe Todd, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Carleton University

Save the Date! New Webinar Series: Indigenous Peoples, Heritage and Landscape in the Asia Pacific: Knowledge Co-Production, Policy Change, and Empowerment

Starting in September the Wenner-Gren Foundation will be sponsoring a new webinar series entitled, “Indigenous Peoples, Heritage and Landscape in the Asia Pacific: Knowledge Co-Production, Policy Change, and Empowerment“, co-sponsored by UCLA Asia Pacific Center, the UCLA Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, The University of New England through the First Peoples Rights and Law Centre, and the National Cheng-chi University through the Center for Taiwan-Philippines Indigenous Knowledge, Local Knowledge, and Sustainable Studies (CTPILS).

For more information about the series and how to register click here.

About the Series:

How do scholars approach community-engaged research? Why is there a need to involve community stakeholders in research? What happens when communities engage the scholars and invest in the research process? An increasing number of scholars have actively strived for the involvement of communities, not just as mere contributors, but as active and involved participants in the research process. This recent shift in research practice is a product of the realization that collaboration among local, indigenous, and other stakeholders provides a venue for inclusive co-production of knowledge. In this webinar series, we showcase examples of successful scholarship in the Asia Pacific where local stakeholders and local communities are actively involved.  Panel members are researchers who actively engage with the communities that they work with.  The webinar series emphasizes that collaborative methodology is a venue where indigenous/local knowledge systems and Western science intersects. The goal is to utilize the knowledge co-production to argue for policy recommendations that has space for co-administration. More importantly, we highlight the importance of collaboration to empowering communities.

The webinar is co-hosted by UCLA Department of Anthropology, UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies, University of Hawaii-Manoa Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Save the Ifugao Terraces Movement (SITMo), Ifugao State University, and the Partido State University.

September Events

Panel 1: Defining the terms: Heritage, Landscapes, Indigenous Empowerment

Wednesday September 16, 8:00 PM (PDT) / Thurs September 17, 11:00 AM (TWN)

Panel 2: Wisdom of the Landscapes 1.0

Wednesday September 23, 8:00 PM (PDT) / Thurs September 24, 11:00 AM (TWN)

Panel 3: Wisdom of the Landscapes 2.0

Wednesday September 30, 8:00 PM (PDT) / Thurs September 31, 11:00 AM (TWN)

October Events

Panel 4: Weaving and Empowerment

Wednesday October 7, 8:00 PM (PDT) / Thurs October 8, 11:00 AM (TWN)

Panel 5: History and Heritage

Wednesday October 14, 8:00 PM (PDT) / Thurs October 15, 11:00 AM (TWN)

Panel 6: Pacific Histories

Wednesday October 21, 8:00 PM (PDT) / Thurs October 22, 11:00 AM (TWN)

Panel 7: Indigeneity, Identity, and Empowerment

Wednesday October 28, 8:00 PM (PDT) / Thurs October 29, 11:00 AM (TWN)

November Events

Panel 8. Indigenous Rights and Heritage Laws

November 4, 2020, 6:00 PM (PDT) / November 5, 2020, 10:00 AM (TWN)

Panel 9. Preserving Textiles: Indigenous Knowledge and Methods

November 11, 2020, 6:00 PM (PST) / November 12, 2020, 10:00 AM (TWN)

Panel 10. Tying Ends Together: Translating Engagement and Empowerment

November 18, 2020, 6:00 PM (PST) / November 19, 2020, 10:00 AM (TWN)

Fejos Postdoctoral Fellowship: Vanessa Wijngaarden

The Wenner-Gren Foundation is excited to share the trailer and blog post from Vanessa Wijngaarden who in 2017 received a Fejos Postdoctoral Fellowship to aid filmmaking on Meeting ‘the Other’ In Maasailand: How We See Them, How They See Us.

Trailer Maasai Speak Back from Vanessa Wijngaarden on Vimeo.

Meeting ‘the Other’ In Maasailand: How We See Them, How They See Us

Fejos Postdoctoral Fellowship

This film project involved the use of material filmed in Tanzania in 2012 (Research Permit No. 2010-343-NA-2010-174, ), as well as the collection of new material. The Tanzanian Commission for Science and Technology (COSTECH) granted Research Permit No. 2018-544-NA-2018-211 for this latter phase. Dr. George Mutalemwa of St. Augustine University of Tanzania, Mwanza operated as a local research collaborator. Although the application for the research permit was already submitted December 14, 2017 and followed up on in the subsequent months, the permit was only obtained November 8, 2018 (valid until Oct 25, 2019). In line with the Immigration Act of the Tanzanian state, this research permit is only valid in combination with a Residence Permit Class C. Although I had previously executed research in Tanzania from 2010-2012, and for that purpose had obtained a Residence Permit Class C without any difficulties, the new government of Tanzania seems to have a less open policy towards foreigners and increased the complexity of immigration procedures. This led to a further delay in obtaining the permissions, but in November 2018 the Residence Permit (No. RPC11110195) was nevertheless obtained.

Filming in Tanzania was carried out in the Arusha region from November to December 2018. I was received with enthusiasm by the community, where I have lived intermittently and counted as a member of the village and local church for the past nine years. In cooperation with the village leader and several representatives (balozi or ɨlbálosini) of the community, a letter of consent was written in English as well as Swahili, in which the agreement between me and the community with regard to the participation in the project and dissemination of the audio-visual material is outlined. This letter was signed and approved with consensus by the rest of the community. In cooperation with Paulo Ngulupa, re-visited members of the community in their circular villages (boma or ɨnkaŋitíe). We first approached the families as a group, showing material we shot of their villages being visited by tourists in 2012. For many community members it was a great surprise and joy to watch themselves and their family in audio-visual material shot such a long time ago.

As the Maasai society is very hierarchical in terms of age and gender relationships, it is hard for anyone but the most highest ranking person present to speak in response to the presented images and questions. I thus decided to approach the people featuring in the videos individually with audio-visual clips in which they themselves featured, providing translations of the Dutch tourists’ conversations in these clips, and asking accompanying questions. In this fashion I visited and filmed 28 community members (8 men and 20 women), executing interviews ranging from 30 minutes to over 2 hours in length. In addition, my research assistant and I interviewed each other in order to reflect on the process of research and filmmaking. The community members provided their considerations and interpretations with regard to their interactions with the tourists, and recorded video messages to send to them. This material was shot with a Sony HDR-AX2000 AVCHD camera. In addition, we used a Sony HDR-CX405 4K AVCHD handycam to document the research and filming processes, also from the perspective of the research assistant.

The end of the month of December 2018 and the month of January 2019 were dedicated to re-visiting the Dutch tourists that were part of the original footage from 2012. All tourist groups I contacted responded positively to the invitation to participate in the follow-up project. Most tourists were visited as a group, while two tourists were interviewed individually. In total, 18 tourists participated, who were filmed during six visits at their homes all over the Netherlands. In preparation of each of the visits, I selected the most interesting segments of the respective tourists’ interactions in 2012, and presented these in combination with the accompanying translations, film material of the Maasai counterparts reacting to the scenes, as well as the personal video messages the relevant Maasai had recorded for them. I filmed the sessions, which took 2.5 to 4 hours each. Most of the Dutch participants changed their ideas of themselves and the Maasai, and many were deeply touched and even emotional as a result of the Maasai’s responses and explanations. All agreed with the purpose of the research and film, and signed the consent forms for use of the audio-visual material.

The total of material collected consists of 13 hours of village visit interactions of the main characters shot in 2012. This is supplemented by 40 hours of filmed cultural tourism interactions of other research participants, and 100 hours of other material shot at the Maasai location, both of which are valuable as B-roll material. The Maasai interviews undertaken in 2018 consist of 43 hours, and the tourist interviews undertaken in 2018/2019 consists of 20 hours. In addition, with the handycam 6 hours were filmed in Maasailand and the Netherlands, which are useful as B-roll and for future reflexive analysis. The total of 76 hours of A-roll material was logged, transcribed and translated during the months of February till June. In addition, logging of the B-roll material was finalized, and several paper edits were constructed. The months of July till October 2019 I dedicated to learning Adobe Premiere Pro (I previously worked with Avid Media Composer) and to create the rough cut. The COVID-19 lockdown in South Africa (starting March 26, 2020) and my resulting forced emigration to Europe (April 26. 2020), the project suffered some delays in the fine-cut stage.

The final film is a feature length documentary (106 minutes) and consists of five chapters (the first being structured as a hook), a bridge, a conclusion and mid-credit scenes. Every chapter evolves around the visit of a different tourist group at a different circular village and features two or three small storylines. The storyline as well as the visual aspects of the film, which playfully feature the differences and parallels in the landscapes and living spaces of the Maasai and Dutch, investigate how relationships across difference are possible, in fact, contrast and continuity are presented as constantly entangled. Essentially, the film explores how we may deal with difference and inequality, and the Dutch as well as Maasai reflections on poverty, hunger, honesty, hospitality, greed, forgiveness and trust, are presented as in conversation with each other. This stimulates the viewer to reflect on the narratives (s)he holds about ‘the other’ and ‘the self’ and in how far (s)he is satisfied with these ideas, adding another layer of reflection.

Stay tuned for more information about the release date of Meeting ‘the Other’ In Maasailand: How We See Them, How They See Us.

Watch Now: As the Statues Fall: A Conversation about Monuments and the Power of Memory

Photo by Keir Gravil

On Thursday, July 23rd, the Wenner-Gren Foundation and SAPIENS in collaboration with the Society of Black Archaeologists and the Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies, hosted “As the Statues Fall: A Conversation about Monuments and the Power of Memory”.

In the wake of global civil unrest following the brutal killings of Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Tony McDade, Atatiana Jefferson, Aura Rosser, Elijah McClain, and countless others at the hands of police in the United States, Black Lives Matter protestors and their allies have critiqued the anti-Black racism imbued in the erection and maintenance of Confederate historical monuments.  The legacy of social movements seeking to remove Confederate statues is longstanding. However, unlike in previous moments, what began as the forced removal of Confederate statues during protests has rippled to the removal of colonialist, imperialist, and enslaver monuments all over the world.  In this webinar, scholars and artists share their insights on the power of monumentality and the work they are doing to reconfigure historical markers.

Featuring:

LaVaughn Belle, Visual Artist
Nicholas Galanin, Tlingit/Unangax Multi-Disciplinary Artist
Dell Upton, PhD, Professor and Chair of Art History, UCLA
Tsione Wolde-Michael, Curator, Smithsonian-NMAH
Moderated by Tiffany Cain, PhD, Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellow in the Princeton Society of Fellows
CART captioning by Joshua Edwards

Conference Program Fellow

Conference Program Fellow
Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, Inc.
New York, NY

The Wenner-Gren Foundation is a private operating foundation dedicated to the advancement of anthropology throughout the world.  Located in New York City, it is one of the major international funding sources for anthropological research and is actively engaged with the anthropological community through its grant, fellowship, conference, publication, and capacity building programs. We are committed to playing a leadership role in anthropology.  We help anthropologists advance anthropological knowledge, build sustainable careers, and amplify the impact of anthropology within the wider world. We are dedicated to broadening the conversation in anthropology to reflect the full diversity of the field.

The Foundation is committed to creating an inclusive work environment and seeks to recruit from a broad pool of talented candidates. We encourage candidates from diverse backgrounds to apply for this position. Addressing the precarity of anthropology and anthropologists is a key element of our mission.  We have designed this position in this spirit. Our aim is to hire a recent doctorate in anthropology who wishes to make service to the discipline an integral part of their career.


Fellowship Opportunity

The Conference Program Fellowship is a two-year paid fellowship. The Fellow will play a pivotal role in Wenner-Gren’s broad slate of academic gatherings.  As an integral member of a small, hardworking team, the Fellow coordinates the Conference and Workshop Program, which provides funding to organizers of small working sessions and major international meetings, and works with the President to plan and host Wenner-Gren’s Symposia and Seminars, which are designed to foster new conversations in anthropology and lead the discipline into new terrain.  In these times of crisis and transformation, the Fellow also participates in organizing and supporting webinars for the public and the broader community of anthropologists, an arena in which the Foundation has a commitment to playing a leadership role.  This position involves intensive interaction with the Foundation’s Advisory Council, which includes leading anthropologists from different subfields, regions, and traditions of scholarship.  The ideal candidate will have an advanced degree in anthropology, be intellectually curious, discerning, and strongly committed to inclusion and racial justice, and have an expansive vision of the discipline.  This individual will also be exceedingly well-organized and collegial, and have experience executing administrative tasks.  The Conference Program Fellow must be an excellent writer, have extraordinary interpersonal skills, and enjoy serving and collaborating with a diverse community of scholars and professionals.

Key Responsibilities

Oversee Conference and Workshop Grant Program:

  • Field inquiries.
  • Participate in application review process, collate results, and rank proposals.
  • Cooperate with President in final selection.
  • Communicate results with applicants.
  • Administer grants and evaluate final reports.
  • Update web information and application materials.
  • Participate in program evaluation and long-term planning.

Oversee Wenner-Gren Symposia:

  • Publicize program and field inquiries
  • Receive and circulate letters of intent with President and Advisory Council.
  • Collect, collate, and circulate feedback from Advisory Council.
  • Participate in discussion of proposed themes at Advisory Council meeting.
  • Cooperate with President in theme selection and the recruitment of organizers.
  • Research possible sites, cooperate with President in venue selection, and manage all communications with hotels and vendors.
  • Organize virtual and in person meetings with organizers. Participate in discussion of format, venue, and process for refining the theme and selecting participants and paper topics.
  • Manage communications with participants and organizers.
  • Manage travel arrangements for participants and organizers.
  • Collaborate with President and organizers to plan supplemental activities.
  • Join President in representing the Foundation at event. Document proceedings.  Serve as liaison for hotel management and vendors.  Take responsibility for all logistical arrangements and address any issues that arise.
  • Oversee preparation of Symposium papers for publication in Current Anthropology. Recruit reviewers and oversee review process.  Manage deadlines.  Coordinate with organizers, journal editors and staff.
  • Update web information.
  • Participate in program evaluation and long-term planning.

Oversee Wenner-Gren Seminars:

  • Publicize program and field inquiries.
  • Receive and circulate letters of intent with President and Advisory Council.
  • Collect, collate, and circulate feedback from Advisory Council.
  • Participate in discussion of proposed topics at Advisory Council meeting.
  • Cooperate with President in theme selection and recruitment of organizers.
  • Research possible sites, cooperate with President in venue selection, and manage all communications with hotels and vendors.
  • Research and brainstorm with President on possible formats.
  • Organize virtual and in person meetings with organizers. Participate in discussion of format, venue, and theme and help the group arrive at a process for developing a list of senior participants, a process for recruiting junior participants, and a description of the roles each participant will play.
  • Manage recruitment of junior participants.
  • Manage communications with participants and organizers.
  • Manage travel arrangements for participants and organizers.
  • Collaborate with President and organizers to plan supplemental activities.
  • Join President in representing the Foundation at event. Document proceedings.  Serve as liaison for hotel management and vendors.  Take responsibility for all logistical arrangements and address any issues that arise.
  • Coordinate follow-up.
  • Update web information.
  • Collaborate with President in program evaluation and long-term planning.


Qualifications and Experience

  • PhD or ABD in anthropology or closely aligned discipline.
  • Track record of service to anthropology.
  • Track record of success in fostering conversation in diverse groups.
  • Proven commitment to an inclusive vision of anthropology.
  • Experience in event planning and management.
  • Self-starter with a high degree of energy and careful attention to detail.
  • Highly flexible, creative problem solver, with a strong ability to multi-task.
  • Excellent oral and written communication skills.
  • Excellent social media skills.
  • Exceptional interpersonal skills.
  • High level of professionalism and demonstrated good judgement.
  • Superb organizational and time management skills.
  • Proficient or advanced skill in Microsoft Suite (Word, Excel, and Outlook).
  • Proficient skill or willingness to learn Salesforce and other event management tools.

 

Compensation

Salary is competitive.  The Foundation provides a generous benefits package, which includes 401(k) plan, health insurance, group term life and disability insurance, paid time off and flexible work arrangements.

 

How to Apply

Applications for the fellowship are being accepted online via Ziprecruiter.com, https://www.ziprecruiter.com/job/ad83eaaf.  You will be asked to upload your curriculum vitae or resume and a letter of interest. In the letter of interest, please comment on how your experience and professional aspirations are a good match for this fellowship.

Applications will be accepted until August 15, 2020.  Due to the expected high volume of applications for the fellowship, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.  The anticipated start date of the fellowship is on or before October 1, 2020.

Acknowledging the precarity faced by many early career anthropologists, the Foundation has designed the fellowship to meet the needs of scholars for whom relocation can be a hardship.  Fellows choose between telecommuting or working at the Foundation’s headquarters in New York City.   Please note that candidates must be authorized to work lawfully in the United States. Wenner-Gren does not provide visa sponsorship for employment.

As the Statues Fall: A Conversation about Monuments and the Power of Memory

Join us for “As the Statues Fall: A Conversation about Monuments and the Power of Memory,” a webinar hosted by the Wenner-Gren Foundation and SAPIENS in collaboration with the Society of Black Archaeologists and the Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies.

In the wake of global civil unrest following the brutal killings of Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Tony McDade, Atatiana Jefferson, Aura Rosser, Elijah McClain, and countless others at the hands of police in the United States, Black Lives Matter protestors and their allies have critiqued the anti-Black racism imbued in the erection and maintenance of Confederate historical monuments.  The legacy of social movements seeking to remove Confederate statues is longstanding. However, unlike in previous moments, what began as the forced removal of Confederate statues during protests has rippled to the removal of colonialist, imperialist, and enslaver monuments all over the world.  In this webinar, scholars and artists share their insights on the power of monumentality and the work they are doing to reconfigure historical markers.

Featuring:

LaVaughn Belle, Visual Artist
Nicholas Galanin, Tlingit/Unangax Multi-Disciplinary Artist
Dell Upton, PhD, Professor and Chair of Art History, UCLA
Tsione Wolde-Michael, Curator, Smithsonian-NMAH
Moderated by Tiffany Cain, PhD, Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellow in the Princeton Society of Fellows
CART captioning by Joshua Edwards

Register Now!

https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_6OhfWig6SwWZTZsY4U1Y-Q

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.